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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
CBS
Apr 6, 2010 7:06pm EDT
west virginia. >> it's the way of life of appalachia, the majority. it provides a great income so you can raise your family and do the things you want to do. i mean, if you... you have to leave the state to get an income that is sufficient as that and you know the hazards and what might happen everyday that you go in. >> reporter: 15,000 west virginiaens work in active underground mine. most shifts run between 10 and 12 hours. relatives learn to live with the fear but they never fully get used to it. as a mom, what is it like to have a son who goes in the mines everyday? >> it's hard. it's real hard. >> reporter: the children of gary quarrels are learning that all too well. they'll miss the man everyone called spanky who died in the explosion at the age of 33. >> it breaks your heart. it breaks your heart. this could be me waiting for news. and my heart goes out to them. >> reporter: the tragic stories of the victims are just starting to emerge here. take the davis family. tim davis, sr., and two of his nephews, corey davis and josh napper all died together yesterday. harry? >> sm
CBS
Apr 9, 2010 7:00pm EDT
peace." ben tracy, cbs news, los angeles >> couric: meanwhile, in west virginia, hope is turning to despair. the fate of four missing miners remains uncertain tonight as once again dangerous conditions inside the mine forced rescue teams to turn back. national correspondent jim axelrod is in montcoal, west virginia. jim, it's been more than four days since this explosion. where does the rescue operation stand now? >> reporter: katie, for the third time in two days rescue teams are back inside the mine, although it is clear to say with every passing hour chances grow slimmer for a miracle in west virginia. the funerals started today in west virginia. 61-year-old benny willingham was among the first laid to rest. his army buddies flew here from california to say good-bye. they used to ask their pal about his dangerous job. >> he said "it is what it is, i've got to take care of the family." he knew what the possibilities could be. >> reporter: the remaining glimmer of hope continued to fade this afternoon after more frustration for rescue crews. at 12:45 this morning, two teams with ei
CBS
Apr 5, 2010 7:00pm EDT
mine in whitesville, west virginia. for a locator, that's about an hour south of the capital of charleston. a state mining official in west virginia confirms six miners are dead, 21 others still unaccounted for and may be trapped. rescue workers, we're told, are on the scene at the upper big branch south mine which is opened by massie energy's performance coal company. this disaster comes four years and a few months after tragedy of is the sago coal mine in the eastern part of west virginia. in that accident 12 miners were killed, one survived after an explosion likely caused by a lightning strike. after say go-- and this is important-- a number of safety changes were implemented. including requirements coal companies provide additional emergency air supplies, better communications, better equipment and tracking devices. at this point, we have no idea what caused today's accident but we will tell you there have been three fatalities in the last dozen or so years at the very same mine. harry? >> smith: bob orr in washington, thanks very much. now the long-anticipated return of ti
CBS
Apr 22, 2010 6:30pm EDT
verizon router, and here in their security center in virginia, they monitor about one billion security events every day-- however, about three-quarters of all cyber-attacks come from outside the united states where the u.s. government has no jurisdiction. >> we're not as prepared as we should be. >> reporter: a reality the white house is trying to change. >> we're looking across the spectrum what are the legal frameworks, not only domestically, but internationally. >> reporter: howard schmidt is the nuclear appointed white house cyber-czar. his job is to make america's networks safe against attacks wherever they come from. >> but the key issue that we understand and we're working towards is reducing the vulnerabilities. >> reporter: the government is also quietly hiring hackers to learn their secrets. last month, mudge began working for darpa, the secretive research arm of the department of defense. however, the u.s. is playing catch-up. countries like china and russia have dedicated considerable resources to the cyber-battlefront, while the u.s. has been slow to react. >> so,
CBS
Apr 19, 2010 7:00pm EDT
from coast to coast today arguing their right to bear arms is under fire. in virginia, where it's legal to openly carry weapons, protestors brought out their big guns, including assault rifles. organizers say they chose this date to mark the anniversary of the revolutionary war battle of lexington and concord. apple has kept plans for its newest iphone concealed but the web site gizmoto says it got the first look at the supersecret device when this one was found in a bar near company headquarters in california. it's slimmer, has a longer battery life and a camera for video conferencing. apple won't say if this is a real deal or an iphoney. up next, a human computer named george. his brain is the hard drive of kramer's hardware. hey what's going on? doing the shipping. man, it would be a lot easier if we didn't have to weigh 'em all. if those boxes are under 70 lbs. you don't have to weigh 'em. with these priority mail flat rate boxes from the postal service, if it fits it ships anywhere in the country for a low flat rate. no weigh? nope. no way. yeah. no weigh? sure. no way! uh-uh. no w
CBS
Apr 23, 2010 6:30pm EDT
reporting tonight from new orleans. in norfolk, virginia, today, 11 suspected pirates were indicted for tacking two u.s. navy ships off somalia. the men were captured in clashes with the warship this is spring. if convicted on federal piracy charges, they'll face a mandatory sentence of life in prison. and coming up next here on the "cbs evening news," haiti's first critical care facility ever. providing victims of the earthquake healing and hope. if you've had a heart attack caused by a completely blocked artery, another heart attack could be lurking, waiting to strike. a heart attack caused by a clot, one that could be fatal. but plavix helps save lives. plavix taken with other heart medicines, goes beyond what other heart medicines do alone, to provide greater protection against heart attack or stroke and even death by helping to keep blood platelets from sticking together and forming clots. ask your doctor about plavix. protection that helps save lives. people with stomach ulcers or other conditions that cause bleeding should not use plavix. taking plavix alone or with some othe
CBS
Apr 29, 2010 7:00pm EDT
. earlier this month, 29 men died in an explosion at a west virginia mine. in central america, a taste of what happened in iceland a few weeks ago. a volcano in guatemala sent a plume of ash tens of thousands of feet in the air this week. flights in the area were canceled, schools were closed, but no injuries have been reported. no school sounds like the perfect chance to play video games, and for cub scouts, that could mean an achievement award. that's right-- cub scouts can now earn awards by playing video games. i'm not sure they need the incentive, but the scouts say it will help boys play games responsibly as part of a balanced, healthy lifestyle. and coming up next, remembering a drum major for justice. he said it releases medicine continuously for 24 hours. he said it could help with her cognition, which includes things like memory, reasoning, communicating and understanding. [ female announcer ] the most common side effects of exelon patch are nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. the likelihood and severity of these side effects may increase as the dose increases. patients may experienc
CBS
Apr 8, 2010 6:30pm EDT
virginia, president obama today ordered federal mine safety officials to give him a report by next week on what caused that explosion that killed at least 25 miners. but right now, the focus is on the four who may still be alive. 32 rescue workers finally got inside the mine today but they were forced to turn back for their own safety. our national correspondent jim axelrod is in mont coal, west virginia. and, jim, how serious is this setback? >> reporter: with slim hope growing only slimmer, katie, and frustration rising, the rescue teams are now preparing to head back into the mine, in sometime in the next few hours and resume their search for the four missing miners. for the family and friends of four missing miners in west virginia, there is little left to do but hold hands and pray. >> we still have four men underground that i know that the god lord savior can reach out and touch them. >> reporter: just before 5:00 this morning, four teams, each with eight rescue workers, entered the mine. four hours later, they had traveled three miles by rail, another mile or so on four-wheel all-te
CBS
Apr 1, 2010 6:30pm EDT
roadwork throughout northern virginia. plus, no more secrets, some maryland college students say it is time to reveal records of classmates found responsible for rape or assault. >> i'm brittany morehouse at the university of maryland, where student journalists are celebrating a letter from the attorney general's office delivered to a state delegate. it's an opinion that says a law protecting student records does not apply to students who are found to have committed rape
CBS
Apr 16, 2010 6:30pm EDT
sprinkles, if anything. maybe pockets of heavier rain in the western metro and northern virginia area and fairfax seeing showers right now. that extends toward manassas seeing the showers move through. what i want to do is track how fast this line of shower activity is moving just off to the east and to
CBS
Apr 12, 2010 7:00pm EDT
. >> couric: hardly. in other news, one week after the explosion at a west virginia coal mine, the last of the bodies are now being recovered. now the focus is shifting to how the disaster happened and who might be to blame. jim axelrod is in charleston, west virginia. >> reporter: at a memorial this afternoon, west virginia's governor tried to soothe the spirits broken by the nation's deadliest mining disaster in 40 years. >> when someone you love becomes a memory, the memory becomes a treasure. we have 29 treasures. 29 treasures. >> reporter: an army of pastors has been busy at church as much ass and funerals across the state since saturday morning when west virginia's worst fears were confirmed and the last four missing miners were found dead. >> we did not receive the miracle that we prayed for. >> reporter: it turns out rescue workers had walked right past three of the four missing miners' bodies in their very first trip into the mine, right after the explosion a week ago. >> there was so much smoke and the conditions were so dire at that time with dust in the air that they apparen
CBS
Apr 7, 2010 6:30pm EDT
begin again with the mine disaster in west virginia and this late-breaking news. we've just learned that on the very day of the explosion the mine's owner was cited for two safety violations, including one for inadequate maps of escape routes. of the 25 miners killed in the blast on monday, the bodies of 18 are still trapped underground but the focus tonight remains on reaching four miners who may still be alive. national correspondent jim axelrod is in montcoal, west virginia, tonight. jim, are rescuers making any progress? >> reporter: maggie, high levels of poisonous gases continue to hamper the rescue effort, but once it's safe, the rescue teams can get back in the mines, it should take less than two hours for them to get to the area they believe the four missing miners might be. this is one of five holes being drilled into the upper big branch mine to vent a toxic mix of methane and carbon dioxide and allow the rescue effort to resume. >> when the rescue teams are prepared, they're charged up, ready to go. and they'll go in a moment's notice. >> reporter: officials are now focu
CBS
Apr 7, 2010 7:00pm EDT
still be alive. national correspondent jim axelrod is in montcoal, west virginia, tonight. jim, are rescuers making any progress? >> reporter: maggie, high levels of poisonous gases continue to hamper the rescue effort, but once it's safe, the rescue teams can get back in the mines, it should take less than two hours for them to get to the area they believe the four missing miners might be. this is one of five holes being drilled into the upper big branch mine to vent a toxic mix of methane and carbon dioxide and allow the rescue effort to resume. >> when the rescue teams are prepared, they're charged up, ready to go. and they'll go in a moment's notice. >> reporter: officials are now focused on three of the five drill sights, all 1,100 feet down where the lethal gas is being vented. two sites are near an air-tight refuge center stocked with enough food and water to last four days where they hope to find three miners. they believe the fourth miner is no more than a thousand feet away near the third drill sight. >> we're hoping someone had the ability-- and we had no way of knowing t
CBS
Apr 6, 2010 7:00pm EDT
virginia miners at sago in 2006. experts suspect the methane may have built up in a closed section of the massey mine and then leaked around a reinforced concrete seal into the area where miners were working. if so, a small spark would have been catastrophic. >> business is what causes people to have quality of life. >> reporter: but investigators will also focus on the safety culture at massey run by controversial c.e.o. don blankenship, last night he issued a statement saying "our top priority is the safety of our miners and the well-being of their families." but blankenship drew criticism four and a half years ago with an earlier internal memo in supervisors in which he seemed to stress productivity over safety. "we seem not to understand that coal pays the bills." >> even if it wasn't stated, if you're saying that production is is the most important part of our operation, you're implying that safety is not the most important part." >> reporter: blankenship later said his memo was misconstrued and safety was not secondary. since the sago accident, numerous mine safety improvemen
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)